When was the last time you thought about your blood pressure? If you're like most people, it probably hasn't been since your doctor mentioned it during your last checkup. But high blood pressure (hypertension) is a serious condition that can lead to life-threatening problems like heart attack and stroke. The good news is that you can lower your risk of hypertension with lifestyle changes.

If you have high blood pressure, you'll probably experience no signs or symptoms of the condition, even if you have extremely high blood pressure.

In very rare cases, and if blood pressure reaches dangerous levels, a person may get headaches or more nosebleeds than normal.

But in the majority of cases, there are no signs or symptoms of hypertension, which is why it has been dubbed the “silent killer.”

If high blood pressure goes undetected for a long period of time, the condition can damage your heart, blood vessels, kidneys, and other parts of your body.

For some people, it takes being diagnosed with coronary heart disease, stroke, or kidney failure to learn that they also have high blood pressure.
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Pilates strengthens and tones your core, including the muscles in your abdomen, pelvis, back, and shoulders, potentially improving your posture and balance.
You’ve probably heard that weight-bearing exercises — such as walking — can help reduce the risk of a broken bone when you have osteoporosis. But don’t overlook Pilates as a potential skeleton-saving workout for those with low bone density.

"The fundamentals of Pilates offer a terrific platform for strengthening bones and preventing fractures if done properly," says Rebekah Rotstein, a Pilates instructor at Kinected in New York City. Rotstein is the creator of Buff Bones, a movement system that draws on Pilates to manage and prevent bone and joint problems.
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“You know, sometimes I feel well and vital in the world, and sometimes I just feel so distressed I want to pull my hair out by the roots.” ~Sharon Stone.

For many, there is something natural about feeling like you want to pull all of your hair out when you’re stressed or overwhelmed. But for millions of others, this is more than a feeling – it is a reality.

The condition, known as “trichotillomania,” effects as much as 4% of the population at some point in their life (roughly 280,000,000 people in the world), and is a common and frequent symptom of stress and anxiety. It’s also not well known, and many people struggle with the condition in silence.
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Millions of people struggle with anxiety every day. Overcoming anxiety is something that takes serious commitment. Most people want to stop panic attacks and anxiety overnight, but your anxiety has been forged through years of experiences, biology, and your own personality.

You can't simply turn that off on a whim.But that doesn't mean there aren't tools that can control your anxiety considerably, and in some cases you may find that these techniques make your anxiety far more manageable. The following are three simple but important things to try to fight anxiety.
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Panic attacks are physical anxiety events that can be debilitating, and may stop your life in its tracks. That's why it's so important to learn how to stop a panic attack and what you can do to prevent them from getting worse.Keep in mind that anxiety is complicated. There is no "surefire" treatment for any anxiety disorder. But the following will help you learn more about what you can do to minimize the effects of your panic.
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You're anxious, worried, freaked. You're upset about (pick one): money, health, work, family, love. Your heart is beating fast, your breathing is shallow and rapid, your mind is imagining doom, and you wish you could just relax…now! Whether you have a full-blown anxiety disorder or are just freaking out, you may not want to try medication—at least not yet.

There are many safe nondrug remedies for anxiety, from mind-body techniques to supplements to calming teas. Some start working right away, while others may help lessen anxiety over time.
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It’s time to start listening to your body. Help avoid serious complications of type 2 diabetes by knowing the warning signs.

Blood sugar that’s consistently out of whack increases your risk of health problems throughout your body, including your heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Resulting complications could lead to disabling, even life-threatening, conditions — and that’s why, if you have type 2 diabetes, practicing good diabetes management and maintaining blood sugar control is a must.

Being aware of possible complications and their symptoms is one of the first steps to successfully managing diabetes, says Gerald Bernstein, MD, director of the diabetes management program at Mount Sinai Beth Israel Hospital in New York City. Educating yourself may help you delay or prevent complications from happening.

Start here, by reading about seven signs of diabetes complications that should never be ignored.
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Green tea doesn’t contain added sugar, is naturally calorie-free when enjoyed plain from the bag, and is a nutritional powerhouse — all of which makes it a great beverage to add to your diabetes diet.

By now, you’ve probably heard about the wonders that green tea can do for a body. Researchers have studied this nutritional powerhouse’s potential role in boosting heart health, fighting infection, and even improving brain function, a review published in Chinese Medicine suggests. But does the beverage also have a place in a type 2 diabetes diet? Turns out, it can.
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Lactose intolerance is a very common digestive problem where your body is unable to digest lactose, which is a type of sugar that is found in dairy products and milk. There are some studies which are done in UK and it is said that in this country lactose intolerance is more common in people of African – Caribbean or Asian descent. This type of digestive problem can develop at any age. In the most cases people who are aged 20 to 40 have increased chances of getting this condition but also there are some cases in which babies and young children can be also affected with it. Lactose intolerance is not the same condition as dairy allergy or milk allergy. Food allergies are caused by our immune system reacting to some types of food. This is causing symptoms such as itching, wheezing and rash. If you are allergic to something, even a tiny particle can be enough to trigger the allergic reaction. The most people, who have lactose intolerance, can still consume small amounts of lactose and they will not experience any problems. But this can vary from person to person.
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